18 Months



What most babies do at this age:

 

Social and Emotional
  • Likes to hand things to others as play
  • May have temper tantrums
  • May be afraid of strangers
  • Shows affection to familiar people
  • Plays simple pretend, such as feeding a doll
  • May cling to caregivers in new situations
  • Points to show others something interesting
  • Explores alone but with parent close by
Language/Communication
  • Says several single words
  • Says and shakes head “no”
  • Points to show someone what he wants
Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
  • Knows what ordinary things are for; for example, telephone, brush, spoon
  • Points to get the attention of others
  • Shows interest in a doll or stuffed animal by pretending to feed
  • Points to one body part
  • Scribbles on his own
  • Can follow 1-step verbal commands without any gestures; for example, sits when you say “sit down”
Movement/Physical Development
  • Walks alone
  • May walk up steps and run
  • Pulls toys while walking
  • Can help undress herself
  • Drinks from a cup
  • Eats with a spoon

 

Act early by contacting Pediatric Therapy Partners if your child:

  • Doesn’t point to show things to others
  • Can’t walk
  • Doesn’t know what familiar things are for
  • Doesn’t copy others
  • Doesn’t gain new words
  • Doesn’t have at least 6 words
  • Doesn’t notice or mind when a caregiver leaves or returns
  • Loses skills he once had

 

Because your child's first years of life are so important, we want to help you provide the best start for your child. The earlier we begin working with your child's development, the better it is for your child, as most developmental problems can be successfully treated if they are identified early. Don't wait and see. Find out and know.
 
 
For a free screening of your child's development, please refer to our Screening Program page for more information.


Information on milestones taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.