4 Months



What most babies do at this age:

 

Social and Emotional
  • Smiles spontaneously, especially at people
  • Likes to play with people and might cry when playing stops
  • Copies some movements and facial expressions, like smiling or frowning
Language/Communication
  • Begins to babble
  • Babbles with expression and copies sounds he hears
  • Cries in different ways to show hunger, pain, or being tired
Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
  • Lets you know if she is happy or sad
  • Responds to affection
  • Reaches for toy with one hand
  • Uses hands and eyes together, such as seeing a toy and reaching for it
  • Follows moving things with eyes from side to side
  • Watches faces closely
  • Recognizes familiar people and things at a distance
Movement/Physical Development
  • Holds head steady, unsupported
  • Pushes down on legs when feet are on a hard surface
  • May be able to roll over from tummy to back
  • Can hold a toy and shake it and swing at dangling toys
  • Brings hands to mouth
  • When lying on stomach, pushes up to elbows
  • Gains weight as expected

 

Act early by contacting Pediatric Therapy Partners if your child:

  • Doesn’t watch things as they move
  • Doesn’t smile at people
  • Can’t hold head steady
  • Doesn’t coo or make sounds
  • Doesn’t bring things to mouth
  • Doesn’t push down with legs when feet are placed on a hard surface
  • Has trouble moving  one or both eyes in all directions
Because your child's first years of life are so important, we want to help you provide the best start for your child. The earlier we begin working with your child's development, the better it is for your child, as most developmental problems can be successfully treated if they are identified early. Don't wait and see. Find out and know.

 

For a free screening of your child's development, please refer to our Screening Program page for more information.


Information on milestones taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.